Sunday, April 17, 2016

Jamestown Rediscovery Field School 2016



Jamestown’s Field School provides a unique opportunity for students to make a contribution to the research and interpretation of early 17th-century English-America. The Field School, jointly offered by the Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation and University of Virginia’s College of Arts and Sciences, introduces participants to the methods and theories of American historical archaeology through hands-on fieldwork on the site of James Fort (1607-1624). Over the course of the Field School, students will learn excavation and recording procedures as well as how to identify and interpret 17th-century European and Native American artifacts. The Field School will include field trips and weekly seminars exploring recent contributions of historical archaeology to colonial history, new methods in field recording and interpretation, and a survey of the recent literature in the discipline, including new publications by the Field School director and senior staff. Both untrained and experienced students will learn practical archaeological skills and the course is also an excellent educational opportunity for teachers seeking re-certification in the social studies content area.

For more information on applying to the field school, go here.

Monday, February 01, 2016

Archaeological Field School at Historic St. Mary's City



Historic St. Mary’s City (HSMC), in association with St. Mary’s College of Maryland, announces its 2016 field school in historical archaeology, May 31st to August 6th, HSMC is a state‑supported, outdoor museum located at the site of Maryland’s first capital (1634-1694).  The main focus of this summer’s excavations is on the yards directly adjacent to the Calvert House. Built in the first decade of Maryland’s settlement by Leonard Calvert, the first Governor, it served as the statehouse of the Province until 1676. Previous testing in the back yard revealed the presence of numerous fences, borrow pits, several outbuildings and the ditch of a 1645 fort. Excavations will seek to better define the fences, identify outbuildings, and explore selected features to aid in dating the development of this landscape.

For the student, the program is an intensive, 10 week experience in Colonial archaeology. The first week includes lectures on history, archaeological methods and material culture studies. Students learn artifact identification by working with one of the best archaeological collections of 17th-century, Colonial material in the country.

During the following weeks, students participate in excavation, recording and analysis. Guest scholars speak on the history and architecture of the Chesapeake region. Field trips to nearby archaeological sites in Maryland and Virginia are planned.  Students will also have the rare opportunity to learn about and help sail the MARYLAND DOVE, a replica of a 17th‑century, square‑rigged tobacco ship.

The HSMC field school is designed for students in American Studies, Anthropology, Archaeology, History, and Museum Studies. Students may register for either Anthropology or History credits.  Prior experience or course work is not required. The ability to engage in active physical labor is essential.  A total of eight (8) credit hours are offered through St. Mary’s College of Maryland, a state honors college dedicated to the Liberal Arts.  The program costs $1560 which covers tuition.  There is a $60 fee to cover the cost of the major field trips.  Housing is available at a reduced cost through the college. Transportation, food and entertainment are the responsibility of the student. HSMC is located two hours south of Washington, D.C. in Southern Maryland.

To apply to the 2016 HSMC Archaeology Field School, send an email or a letter stating your interest in the course and listing any relevant classes, experience, or special skills. Include the email addresses of two academic references. Please list a phone number and address both at school and at home where you can be reached after the semester is over. Housing is limited so apply early. For specific questions about the course, email: SilasH@digshistory.org or send letters to:

Archaeology Program
Department of Research & Collections, HSMC
P.O.Box 39
St. Mary's City, Maryland 20686

Application Deadline: April 24, 2016

Sunday, January 24, 2016

Pottersville Field School 2016, North Carolina



The first innovation and development of alkaline-glazed stoneware pottery in America occurred in the Edgefield District of South Carolina in the early 1800s. It remains an enduring mystery as to how these new ceramic methods were developed in that place and time, and how the techniques of clay choice, temper, and glaze developed over the following century. These potteries employed enslaved and free African-American laborers in the 19th century, and the stoneware forms also show evidence of likely African cultural influence on stylistic designs. Edgefield potteries thus present fascinating research questions of understanding technological innovations and investigating the impacts of African cultural knowledge and racial ideologies on a craft specialization during the historic period in America. This project entails an interdisciplinary, collaborative, and archaeological study of the first development in America of alkaline-glazed stoneware pottery forms, the development of that South Carolina industry over time, and the impacts of racism and African cultural influences on those processes.
This project seeks to undertake detailed archaeological investigations of principal sites in Edgefield, conduct archival research, and start a multi-year community engagement and education program related to these subjects. Archaeological field schools and research teams at such pottery sites can explore both the production facility remains and the residential sectors for the enslaved and free African-American laborers. Primary research questions include: (1) examining the distribution of work areas and residential locations in each pottery site and analyze the degree of spatial segregation due to the impacts of slavery and racism; (2) understanding differential uses and development of those work and residential spaces, as reflected in archaeological features and artifact distributions, and the degree to which variations correlate with different racial categories associated with the occupants; (3) analyzing faunal and botanical remains to explore and contrast dietary and health patterns between residential sites and the degree to which variations correlate with different racial categories associated with the occupants; and (4) understanding the development and changes over time in the technologies of pottery production at these three manufacturing sites.

Join us at the Pottersville site for archaeology in the summer of 2016! We return for another season of field research on the amazing heritage and history of Edgefield pottery production.

Students and volunteers will work in supervised teams, learning to uncover the archaeological record as members of an investigative team, with skills employed by professional archaeologists. You receive training in the techniques of excavation, mapping, artifact classification, and contextual interpretation. Laboratory processing and analysis will also be ongoing during the field season. Evening talks by project staff, visiting archaeologists, and historians will focus on providing background on how field data are used to answer archaeological and historical research questions. Lodging will be provided at the beautiful Edgefield Inn. Mr. Bettis Rainsford, the owner of the Inn, has been incredibly supportive of our archaeology projects and provides rooms at a fraction of the usual rates for this elegant hotel. Download an application form here.


Wednesday, December 02, 2015

One use of Drones in archaeology

Hmong Girls climbing on one of the jars at Site 1
Hmong Girls climbing on one of the jars at Site 1 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
This is a short but interesting video of 100 sites of the Plains of Jars in Laos. The jars are associated with burial sites, and the drone allows one to see the overall countryside in relationship to the sites.
http://ow.ly/VnMI6

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Ancient Paquime and the Casas Grande World - Book Review




K. Kris Hirst has done an excellent job reviewing Ancient Paquime and the Casas Grande World, so I will just add that Paquime is in northern Chihuahua, Mexico, and can be visited today. The book covers the 40 years of research that has been done since Charles di Peso's ground-breaking work was published.

Minnis Paul E., and Whalen Michael E., editors. 2015. Ancient Paquime and the Casas Grande World Tucson: The University of Arizona Press. ISBN-13 978-0-8165-3131-8 (acid free paper). Amerind Studies in Anthropology, John A. Ware, series editor. 208 pages, foreword, 9 chapters, bibliography, contributor biographies and an index.

Monday, April 06, 2015

Great Dismal Swamp Archaeological Field School, May 13- June 17th


American University and the Department of Anthropology are pleased to invite students to participate in the 6th Great Dismal Swamp Archaeology Field School to start during the early summer of 2015. The Field School will take place in the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) located in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina (near Norfolk, Suffolk, and Virginia Beach, VA, and Elizabeth City, NC). This summer’s course represents a continuation of the Great Dismal Swamp Landscape Study (GDSLS), an initiative started by the Project Director, Dr. Dan Sayers, in 2001. We will be working in close partnership with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, the stewards of the Refuge, and maintaining and developing interactive dialogue with the broader public. A main research focus for the GDSLS in 2015 will be on further developing our understanding of the internal dynamics of resistant and generally self-reliant communities in the swamp interior (composed primarily of Indigenous Americans and African-Americans who permanently removed themselves from conditions of enslavement, also known as maroons). We are also interested in the impacts of historical processes of colonialism (1600s), race-based enslavement (1700s), and profitable development of natural resources (1800s) on the swamp and its resistance communities.
In 2015, our fieldwork will emphasize site discovery and archaeological survey rather than the more intensive excavations at known sites that we have done in past AU field schools. Participants will share in the excitement of recording previously unknown archaeological sites while also helping us to vastly increase our understanding of pre-Civil War swamp life and population dynamics within the swamp’s political economy.
For full consideration please apply to the 2015 Dismal Swamp Field School no later than April 15, 2015. Application can be found here .
Please send applications and direct any school-related questions to:
Dr. Daniel O. Sayers
Department of Anthropology
Battelle-Tompkins Bldg
American University
Washington DC 20016
sayers@american.edu
202-885-1833

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

The International Brigades Archaeology Project - September 1-15, 2015

English: Memorial plate for international brig...
English: Memorial plate for international brigade from London to the Spanish civil war. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The International Brigades Archaeology Project (IBAP) is studying the sites of the Spanish Civil War in Spain. In 1937, the 15th International Brigade, including the Abraham Lincoln, British, and MacKenzie-Papineau Battalions, was heavily involved in a fierce battle for the small Aragonese town of Belchite. After taking the town, the 15th had to defend it again in 1938, and as a result of both battles the town was almost totally destroyed. Its ruins were left untouched by the Franco regime as a ‘living’ monument to the Civil War. Today it stands as a reminder of the destruction and brutality of all wars, and this unique site and its surrounding area, which has never received archaeological attention will, again, be the focus of our fieldwork in September 2015.

IBAP is now taking applications for the September 2015 field season. 

We would like participants to come for two weeks, but there is a one week option. The fees for taking part are (UK)£945 for two weeks and (UK)£480 for one week. 

This year, we will be staying in Belchite itself, and the fees include all accommodation and meals, and travel to and from our places of work. All equipment is provided in the field. Further information on what is included can be found in the IBAP 2015 Participation and Information document.

All participants will have to arrange their own travel to and from Spain, and travel to Zaragoza if anyone is flying to another city in Spain. Nevertheless, the project will pick up all arrivals at either Zaragoza airport, or Zaragoza train station. Participants will also have to arrange their own travel insurance. 

If you need any further information, please contact IBAP directly at: ibapinfo@gmail.com

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Valcamonica Rock Art and Archaeology Fieldwork & Fieldschool

From July 16 to August 6 2015 the annual archaeology field school at Paspardo will be open to archaeologists, scholars, students and enthusiasts. This area gives a great opportunity to learn, survey, photograph, draw and catalogue the rock engravings. The program involves field research, documentation, tracing, guided visits and lectures. Fieldwork is organised by Footsteps of Man, Valcamonica. Infos, poster and photo-galleries here available.


Saturday, February 22, 2014

Mount Vernon 2014 Collaborative Historic Preservation Field School May 27- July 3


George Washington’s Mount Vernon, located near Washington, DC, is the historic site dedicated to interpreting the life of the first president within the context of his home and plantation.  The 2014 Mount Vernon/University of Maryland (UMD) Field School in Historic Preservation is in the second year of a multi-year project to explore the archaeological, architectural, and interpretive histories of the Washington families’ and create an integrated approach to its study, documentation, and public presentation.

This course will instruct students in historic preservation method and theory. Students will learn archaeological and architectural field methodology, laboratory procedures, and current themes in historical archaeology and preservation. Through readings, discussions, and field trips, as well as conducting fieldwork at George Washington’s original Mansion House Farm, students will delve into three prominent themes of historic house museums – the evolution of the plantation landscape, African American history, and public interpretation.

Details:

  • Field school dates: May 27th - July 3
  • Faculty: UMD Professor Donald Linebaugh and MVLA Historic Preservation staff 
  • College Credit: 6 undergraduate or graduate cred
  • Housing: Mount Vernon does not offer housing on the property, but staff will work with students to find local accommodations if necessary. 
  • A modest stipend will be provided.

Qualifications:

  • Full-time undergraduate or graduate student with good academic standing. 
  • Interest in historical archaeology, historic preservation, museums, and American history. 
  • Strong communication skills and the ability to work as part of a team. 
  • Capable of doing strenuous work outdoors in hot and humid
  •  conditions. 

Applicants should submit a resume, contact information for two references and
letter, including a statement detailing interest in this program by March 31st, 2014. Please email Eleanor Breen, Deputy Director for Archaeology, ebreen@mountvernon.org

Enhanced by Zemanta

Strawbery Banke Museum Archaeology Field School 2014

Strawbery Banke Museum
Strawbery Banke Museum (Photo credit: Selbe B)
The Strawbery Banke Museum Archaeology Department is pleased to announce its 18th Annual Archaeological Field School!

June 23 - July 25, 2014, Monday - Friday 8:30am - 4pm

Strawbery Banke Museum is an outdoor living history museum located in historic Portsmouth, NH. Strawbery Banke archaeologists have conducted some of the largest urban archaeology projects in New Hampshire. Previous excavations at Strawbery Banke have revealed information on domestic life, immigration, building traditions, pottery manufacture, and other industries, and have demonstrated that Portsmouth is one of the richest sites for historical archaeology in northern New England.

Course Description: This five-week session will focus on locating evidence of an early 20th century mikveh, or Jewish ritual bath, on the museum grounds.  Students will be trained in proper archaeological techniques and will learn to identify historic artifacts.  Day trips in the area, museum tours by experts, and required readings on Historical Archaeology and the Jewish diaspora will introduce students to various areas of historic specialization.  Students will also work in our laboratory to gain experience in processing artifacts. This field school places a special emphasis on public interpretation.  Students will interact with museum
visitors daily, and will be expected to offer interpretation of the site and our excavation activity.

Requirements: This field school does not require previous archaeological field experience, though an introductory course in archaeology may be helpful.  Archaeological fieldwork can be demanding, and students should be able to work well as part of a team and tolerate physical activity and summer weather.  If you are concerned about the requirements, please contact the instructor.

Cost: $850 per person
Available Credits: Students may arrange to receive academic credit through their university. Room and Board: Students are responsible for their own accommodations and transportation.

Enrollment information: To apply, send a one-page letter detailing your interest in the field school, along with a resume or CV that includes names and contact information for two references to Strawbery Banke archaeologist and field school instructor Alexandra Martin at amartin@strawberybanke.org by May 1, 2014. Enrollment is limited to 12 students.

Related articles
Enhanced by Zemanta